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Weight Loss Surgery

Bariatric Surgery Procedures

Sleeve Gastrectomy


Sleeve gastrectomy limits food intake by reducing the size of the stomach. A stapling device is used to divide the stomach vertically, leaving behind a thin vertical sleeve of stomach. Hormonal changes result in a decrease in hunger while the sleeve increases the feeling of being full since smaller portions of food can fit in the reduced stomach. The excised portion of the stomach is permanently removed.

Advantages:

  • Restricts the amount of food the stomach can hold
  • Induces rapid and significant weight loss that comparative studies find similar to that of the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Weight loss of greater than 50 percent for three to five years post surgery, and weight loss comparable to that of the bypass with maintenance of greater than 50 percent
  • Requires no foreign objects (gastric banding), and no bypass or re-routing of the food stream (gastric bypass)
  • Involves a relatively short hospital stay of approximately one to two days
  • Causes favorable changes in gut hormones that suppress hunger, reduce appetite and improve satiety

Disadvantages/Risks:

  • This is a non-reversible procedure
  • Has the potential for longterm vitamin deficiencies
  • Surgery risks include complications due to stomach stapling including bleeding, infection, blood clots, gastroesophageal reflex and other risks associated with bariatric surgery. Please speak with your surgeon about these and other risks in more detail

Source: asmbs.org

Sleeve Gastrectomy

Roux-EN-Y Gastric Bypass


Stapling is used to create a small, upper stomach pouch that restricts the amount of food that can be consumed. A portion of the small bowel is bypassed thus delaying food from mixing with the digestive juices to avoid complete calorie absorption. Weight loss is induced by hormonal changes that decrease hunger and increase the feeling of being full.

Advantages:

  • Average 77 percent reduction of excess body weight one year after surgery
  • Studies show that after 10 to 14 years, patients have maintained 60 percent reduction of excess body weight
  • Studies show that 96 percent of associated health problems studied were improved or resolved, including back pain, sleep apnea, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes and depression
  • In most cases patients report an early sense of fullness, combined with a sense of satisfaction that reduces the desire to eat
  • Produces significant long-term weight loss (60 to 80 percent excess weight loss)
  • Restricts the amount of food that can be consumed
  • May lead to conditions that increase energy expenditure
  • Produces favorable changes in gut hormones that reduce appetite and enhance satiety
  • Typical maintenance of more than 50 percent excess weight loss

Disadvantages/Risks:

  • Poor absorption of iron and calcium
  • Chronic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Dumping syndrome can occur when too much sugar or large amounts of food are consumed
  • Bypassed portion of the stomach, duodenum and segments of the small intestine cannot be easily visualized using X-ray of endoscopy
  • Operative risks of bypass include bleeding, infection, blood clots and clots that go to the lung. Please speak with your surgeon to learn more details
Source: asmbs.org

Roux-EN-Y Gastric Bypass