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St. Charles Bend: Tower Remodel

As part of this $27.7 million project, patient rooms on the third and fourth floors of St. Charles Bend will be 30 percent larger.

St. Charles Bend will undergo a major remodel that will extend the lifespan of the 39-year-old facility and improve privacy and comfort for patients, families and caregivers.

Starting in October 2014, St. Charles Bend will undergo a major remodel that will extend the lifespan of the 39-year-old facility and improve privacy and comfort for patients, families and caregivers.

Aging electrical, plumbing and ventilation systems will be updated and the new windows will be double glazed to allow better control of temperatures in the rooms. The core areas in the middle of the floors will be redesigned to support the work process of caregivers and to improve the overall flow.

The project will be completed in eight phases over a two-and-a-half year period. Patient rooms will be remodeled 12 at a time, and designated rooms elsewhere in the facility will make up for that bed space.

“This is the biggest project I’ve been involved with in terms of potential disruption and the length of time,” said Rick Martin, vice president of construction and real estate for St. Charles Health System, who has worked for the organization for 36 years. “The benefits are going to be great when we are done.”

"Teams have spent months designing the new rooms to ensure maximum efficiency," said Jim Walker, director of construction and real estate for St. Charles. In addition, an acoustic engineer has been engaged to consult on the project and provide expertise on how to reduce the noise in the rooms adjacent to the construction.

At times, it is possible that patients will be placed in double occupancy rooms. Those in rooms close to the construction zones will be offered ear plugs, sound machines and other amenities to ensure their stay is as pleasant and healing as possible.

“We want people to understand that we are doing this project to improve our patient care experience and to expand the life of this hospital, which truly is a community asset,” Martin said. “Essentially, in the end, we will have a new hospital that will last at least another 30 years.”